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London Underground industrial actionPeople waiting at a bus stop in Paddington in London, as Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) are taking industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions. Picture date: Monday June 6, 2022. PA Photo. See PA story INDUSTRY Tube. Photo credit should read: Danielle Desouza/PA Wire
People waiting at a bus stop in Paddington in London this morning Photograph: Danielle Desouza/PA
London Underground industrial actionPeople waiting tp board a bus in Paddington in London, as Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) are taking industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions. Picture date: Monday June 6, 2022. PA Photo. See PA story INDUSTRY Tube. Photo credit should read: Danielle Desouza/PA Wire
People waiting at a bus stop in Paddington in London this morning Photograph: Danielle Desouza/PA

Second weakest May car sales in 30 years

UK car sales have slumped again, as shortages of computer chips hampers production and the cost of living squeeze hits spending.

New car registrations fell by over 20% last month, year-on-year, to just 124,394 units.

That’s the second weakest May in three decades (after May 2020, when sales plunged during the pandemic lockdown).

Trade body the SMMT reported that:

The decline, compared with the first full month of reopened showrooms in May last year, demonstrates the impact of continued global supply chain disruptions, with the market -32.3% below the 2019 pre-pandemic level despite strong order books.

Twice as many battery electric cars were sold than diesel, as motorists shifted to greener cars.

BEV sales rose by 17.7% to 15,448, and made up 12.4% of the month’s registrations, as manufacturers prioritise their supply. Diesel sales halved year-on-year, to just 7,614.

Travellers in Yorkshire also face disruption today as Arriva bus drivers begin industrial action over a pay offer.

Arriva Yorkshire said Unite union members were expected to strike from 02:00 BST on Monday “for an undisclosed period of time”.

Unite says the offer of a 4.1% pay increase to its 650 members was “pitiful” and well below the current inflation rate (CPI hit 9% in April, while the retail prices index shows prices rising by 11.1% over the last year).

The company called the strike action “unjustified”.

As the FT’s Northern Correspondent Jennifer Williams points out, many passengers won’t have alternative transport options:

Not just the tube on strike today. Indefinite pay strike is crippling bus services in Yorkshire - this is after months of routes being cut back due to driver shortages, in a place where many people have little public transport alternative https://t.co/KiwL1Jp9Ig

— Jennifer Williams (@JenWilliamsMEN) June 6, 2022

More flights have been cancelled today, as the aviation industry struggles to cope with the rise in demand for travel amid a severe staffing shortage.

PA Media has the details:

After cancelling dozens of flights over the weekend, easyJet scrapped a further 26 due to arrive at or depart from Gatwick on Monday.

These included from destinations such as Bilbao, Madrid and Seville in Spain, Milan and Palermo in Italy, Geneva and Zurich in Switzerland, and Malta.

British Airways axed more than 100 short-haul flights at Heathrow on Monday, although the airline stressed that passengers affected were given advance notice.

Tui Airways is cancelling six daily flights at Manchester.

More air travel chaos looms this summer

The half-term travel disruption will have made passengers nervous about planning summer holidays.

And unfortunately, air traffic control delays in Europe are expected to bring further travel chaos to UK airports in the months ahead.

Europe’s air traffic agency has warned that the number of flights will exceed the capacity of control centres to handle them across large parts of the continent this summer, and urged some countries to review their operations to avoid sudden disruption.

Reims in eastern France, Munich and Athens face particularly acute problems, but Eurocontrol is worried that much of Europe, including the UK, was operating close to capacity. The FT has more details.

#TubeStrike latest: - Circle, Victoria, Waterloo City Lines suspended - Northern Line reduced service btwn Edgware and Golders Green/ Archway and High Barnet / Finchley Central and Mill Hill East / Kennington and Morden - No Bakerloo Line btwn Queens Park and Elephant Castle

— BBC Radio London Travel (@BBCTravelAlert) June 6, 2022

Great Northern, which runs rail services in the south east England including Thameslink, has warned passengers to expect delays due to the tube strike.

Great Northern services to and from Moorgate are being disrupted by industrial action on the Tube network.

Old Street station is expected to remain closed for the rest of the day.

Highbury Islington is not currently being served by Great Northern.

You will need to make your way to an alternative station in the area.

Please be aware that Southern, Thameslink and Great Northern trains and stations in the London area will be extremely busy. Other National Rail operators are likely to be affected as well.

Please leave at least 20 minutes of additional time for your journey.

🔀 You will need to make your way to an alternative station in the area.

📢 Please be aware that other trains and stations in London are likely to be extremely busy.

— Great Northern (@GNRailUK) June 6, 2022

📢 Great Northern services are likely to be extremely busy today.

Other National Rail operators may also be affected.

⏱ Please allow plenty of extra time to complete your journey today.

— Great Northern (@GNRailUK) June 6, 2022

👍 Trains can now run on the route to/from Moorgate.

⛔️ However, they still cannot stop at:

• Highbury Islington • Old Street

📱 Journey planners are being updated in real time, so please check ahead at https://t.co/IkKEN3Snsc

— Great Northern (@GNRailUK) June 6, 2022

📢 Great Northern services are likely to be extremely busy today.

Other National Rail operators may also be affected.

⏱ Please allow plenty of extra time to complete your journey today.

— Great Northern (@GNRailUK) June 6, 2022
Commuters queue to board packed buses at Victoria Station as a tube strike impacts the Monday morning rush hour today.
Commuters queue to board packed buses at Victoria Station as a tube strike impacts the Monday morning rush hour today. Photograph: Leon Neal/Getty Images
Commuters queue to board packed buses at Victoria Station as a tube strike impacts the Monday morning rush hour today.
Commuters queue to board packed buses at Victoria Station as a tube strike impacts the Monday morning rush hour today. Photograph: Leon Neal/Getty Images

London underground disruption: latest status

An electronic sign at Waterloo Station in London.
An electronic sign at Waterloo Station in London. Photograph: Beresford Hodge/PA

The Circle, Victoria and Waterloo City underground lines are all currently closed due to the tube strike strike.

Many other lines are disrupted, with services not running into central London, as this map shows:

London underground map, during tube strike June 6th
London underground map, with disrupted lines in colour Photograph: TFL

TFL’s status updates website shows that (at 8.40am):

  • Bakerloo Line: Service operating between Queen’s Park and Harrow Wealdstone, approximately every 10 minutes.
  • Central Line: Service operating between White City and West Ruislip / Ealing Broadway, approx. every 20 minutes and between Liverpool Street and Epping / Hainault via Newbury Park, approx. every 15 minutes. No service on the rest of the line due to strike action by RMT.
  • District Line: Service operating between Whitechapel and Upminster, approx every 10 mins, between Edgware Road and Wimbledon, approx every 10 mins and between High St Kensington and Ealing Broadway / Richmond, approx every 15 min.
  • Hammersmith and City Line: Service operating between Hammersmith and Whitechapel, approximately every 10 minutes.
  • Jubilee Line: Service operating between Finchley Road and Stanmore, approximately every 5 minutes and between Stratford and Canning Town, approximately every 10 minutes with some stations closed.
  • Northern Line: Service operating between Edgware and Golders Green, between Archway and High Barnet and between Finchley Central and Mill Hill East, approximately every 6 - 8 minutes with some stations closed. Service operating between Morden and Kennington, approximately every 7 minutes with some stations closed.
  • P iccadilly Line: Service operating between Earl’s Court and Heathrow Terminals 2 3 and between Acton Town and Raynes Lane, approx. every 20 minutes with some stations closed.

#TubeStrike - Hammersmith and City Line running between Hammersmith and Whitechapel about every 10 mins - Metropolitan Line operating a good service

— BBC Radio London Travel (@BBCTravelAlert) June 6, 2022

There’s a long queues for buses this morning at Victoria Station as the tube strike disrupts journeys, reports the BBC’s Sarah Morris:

Commuters at Waterloo Station in London this morning, as members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union take industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions.
Commuters at Waterloo Station in London this morning, as members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union take industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions. Photograph: Luke O’Reilly/PA

Frustrated commuters have gathered around the entrance to Waterloo underground station after the Tube was shut by today’s strike, PA Media reports.

One commuter, Charlotte from Surbiton, said she was unsure if she would be able to complete her journey to Canary Wharf.

She said:

“We’ll see if anything opens up, and I’ll go home if it doesn’t”

“I’m pretty sure everyone will be delayed coming in today.”

She said she had been traveling for almost an hour already, adding that she didn’t feel like the strike was justified.

“I don’t necessarily see the reason for the strike”.

“It doesn’t necessarily feel like it’s justified to cause this much disruption, especially when London is getting up and running again. It seems like a big setback for the city.”

Full story: Travellers in London told to avoid tube as strike begins

Julia Kollewe

Julia Kollewe

Jubilee line trains parked at the London Underground Stratford Market Depot in Stratford, east London.
Jubilee line trains parked at the London Underground Stratford Market Depot in Stratford, east London. Photograph: Stefan Rousseau/PA

London’s transport operator warned people to expect “severe disruption” on the tube today as 4,000 station staff are due to walk out in a 24-hour strike that will shut down much of the network.

Transport for London said there would be problems across all lines from the start of service on Monday to 8am on Tuesday, with a limited number of stations open. It advised against travel on the tube throughout that period “unless necessary”.

The RMT union has called the strike in protest against TfL plans to cut 600 jobs to reduce costs. Only London Underground station staff will be involved, rather than the 10,000 RMT members who walked out in March.

Sources close to the union said the scale of the walkouts meant the entire tube network should close on safety grounds. TfL said:

“Safety is our top priority and we will be doing all we can to safely keep as many services running for our customers as possible.”

Some tube stations had already shut temporarily over the platinum jubilee holiday weekend because of staff not working overtime as part of separate industrial action by RMT that started on Friday and is due to continue until 10 July.

Introduction: Thousands of Britons stuck at airports as tube strikes add to travel disruption

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of business, the world economy and the financial markets.

The UK’s travel chaos continues today. Flight cancellations and a tube strike in London means that half-term holidaymakers and people returning to work after the jubilee weekend face face more disruption.

Tens of thousands of British travellers are estimated to be stuck at airports across Europe after up to 200 flight cancellations over the weekend, following a week of misery for families.

The disruption means some children, and teachers, will be unable to return to school in time for today’s classes -- in the middle of the exam season.

EasyJet cancelled another 80 flights on Sunday, mainly affecting Gatwick airport, after 25 departures and 22 arrivals were cancelled on Saturday. The airline says:

“We are very sorry and fully understand the disruption this will have caused for our customers.

We are focused on getting them to their destination as soon as possible.”

Eurostar passengers faced travel misery on Sunday too, as a power supply failure at Paris Gare du Nord meant all services to/from Paris are subject to major delays and cancelations.

A strike on the London underground is expected to cause travel chaos in the capital too, as many workers return to the office after the long Bank Holiday break.

Transport for London say they will keep as many stations as possible open, but expect the strike to cause severe disruption and the closure of many Tube stations.

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union are taking industrial action in a dispute over jobs and pensions.

The government has criticised the travel sector’s failure to handle the surge in demand as pandemic restrictions have been relaxed, with airlines struggling to take on more employees fast enough.

The aviation industry says recruitment is being held up by security checks, but transport secretary Grant Shapps argues that staff cuts during the pandemic had gone too deep.

He told the BBC:

“The industry itself needs to solve it.

The government doesn’t run airports, it doesn’t run the airlines. The industry needs to do that.”

“We’ll work with the industry very hard ... to make sure we don’t see a repeat of those scenes.”

London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, said Brexit had caused the chaos. He called on the government to relax immigration rules to allow airport and airline workers who returned to their EU countries of origin following Brexit to come back to the UK.

Also coming up today

The UK parliament’s Treasury Committee will hold a hearing with chancellor Rishi Sunak, to discuss the £15bn cost of living package announced last month.

The Committee will ask Sunak whether the measures could cause higher inflation, whether support was sufficiently targeted to lower income households, and what impact the Energy Profits Levy will have on investment in the UK.

They’ll also ask what further measures may be required later in the year, given the calls for an emergency budget to help households.

European stock markets are expected to open higher.

The agenda

  • 9am BST: UK new car sales for May
  • 1.45pm BST: Rishi Sunak appears before Treasury Committee on cost of living support